The Performance of Memory as Transitional Justice

Based on case studies spanning time and geography from the Spanish to the Nigerian civil wars, to government repression in Argentina and genocidal policies in Guatemala and Rwanda and, finally, to forced population removal in Australia and Israel, this collection represents a focused attempt to come to grips with some of the strategies used to publicly engage with traumatic memory work.
Auteur(s):
S. Elizabeth Bird, Fraser M. Ottanelli
Reeks:
Series on Transitional Justice
Volume:
19
boek | verschenen | 1e editie
december 2014 | viii + 202 blz.

Hardback
€ 60,-


ISBN 9781780682624


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Based on case studies spanning time and geography from the Spanish to the Nigerian civil wars, to government repression in Argentina, genocidal policies in Guatemala and Rwanda and on to forced population removal in Australia and Israel, this collection represents a focused attempt to come to grips with some of the strategies used to express traumatic memory work. Together, the essays constitute a kaleidoscope of new approaches to show how such performances of memory contribute to transitional justice efforts, demonstrating the complexities of striving for justice and reconciliation through the public expression of shared memories of violence.

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Table of Contents (p. 0)

Introduction (p. 1)

PART I. THE LIMITS AND POTENTIAL OF TRANSITIONAL JUSTICE MECHANISMS

Chapter 1. Troubles with Truth Commissions: Putting the Moral Aims of Truth Commissions to the Fore (p. 5)

Chapter 2. Legalising Collective Remembrance after Mass Atrocities (p. 23)

Chapter 3. The Politics of Reparations and Apologies: Historical l and Symbolic Justice within the Rwandan Conte (p. 43)

PART II. THE WORK OF NARRATIVE IN RECALIBRATING NATIONAL MEMORY

Chapter 4. Stories Told and Untold: Reparation, Recognition and Reshaping National Memories in Australia (p. 59)

Chapter 5. Competing Narratives in Rwandan Reconciliation (p. 81)

Chapter 6. Where Is My Grandfather? Impunity and Memory in Spain (p. 97)

Chapter 7. The Role of Direct-Experience People in Promoting Transitional Justice: The Israeli Case (p. 115)

PART III. MEMORY WORK AS TRANSITIONAL JUSTICE

Chapter 8. The Asaba Memorial Project: Negotiating a Community Collaboration (p. 133)

Chapter 9. Testimonies of Violence in Post-Conflict Guatemala: Circulation and the Transnational Politics of Misrecognition (p. 153)

Chapter 10. Conceptualising Alternative Forms of Justice: The Politics of Memorialisation in Rwanda (p. 167)

Chapter 11. Memories of Violence: Literature and Transitional Justice in Argentina (p. 181)

Chapter 12. Majdanek: The Work of Memory (p. 197)

About the Authors (p. 199)

Over de reeks

Series on Transitional Justice

Countries emerging from long periods of authoritarian rule must often confront a legacy of gross human rights abuses perpetrated over many years. During the past two decades, these age-old issues have been termed “problems of transitional justice”, both by academics and policy makers around the world. Given the frequency with which these problems arise, as well as the complexity of the issues involved, it is striking that no book series has taken the issue of transitional justice as its point of focus.

The Series on Transitional Justice offers a platform for high-quality research within the rapidly growing field of transitional justice. This research is, of necessity, inter-disciplinary in nature, drawing from disciplines such as law, political science, history, sociology, criminology, anthropology and psychology, as well as from various specialised fields of study such as human rights, victimology and peace studies. It is furthermore international in outlook, drawing on the knowledge and experience of academics and other specialists in many different regions of the world.

The series is aimed at a variety of audiences who are either working or interested in fields such as crime and justice; human rights; humanitarian law and human security; conflict resolution and peace building. These audiences may include academics, researchers, students, policy makers, practitioners, non-governmental organisations and the media.

Editorial board:
- Prof. S. Parmentier (University of Leuven, Belgium)
- Prof. Elmar Weitekamp (University of Tübingen, Germany)
- Prof. Jeremy Sarkin (University of South Africa) and
- Mina Rauschenbach (Université de Lausanne and University of Leuven) (Associate editor)

With a subscription to the series you enjoy a 15% discount on each volume.

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