Re-Member

The recruitment and operations of child soldiers have been hitting the headlines in politics and the media for many years. However, a much broader circle of children is affected by armed conflicts. Hence, the many challenges to deal with youth affected by armed conflict exceed by far the issue of the recruitment and demobilisation of child soldiers, but also extend to questions of rehabilitation, reintegration and reconciliation processes of all children and youths. This book brings together for the first time a wide range of leading scholars from three disciplinary perspectives (children’s rights, psychosocial studies and transitional justice) and aims at enhancing a multidisciplinary and comprehensive approach to the rehabilitation, reintegration and reconciliation processes of children and adolescents affected by armed conflict.
Editor(s):
Ilse Derluyn, Cindy Mels, Stephan Parmentier, Wouter Vandenhole
Reeks:
Series on Transitional Justice
Volume:
11
boek | verschenen | 1e editie
februari 2012 | xxxviii + 568 blz.

Hardback
€ 100,-


ISBN 9789400000278


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Inhoud

The recruitment and operations of child soldiers have been hitting the headlines in politics and the media for many years. However, a much broader circle of children is affected by armed conflicts. Hence, the many challenges to deal with youth affected by armed conflict exceed by far the issue of the recruitment and demobilisation of child soldiers, but also extend to questions of rehabilitation, reintegration and reconciliation processes of all children and youths.

In stark contrast to the complex reality of armed conflict and the involvement of children therein, academic work thus far has taken a rather narrow view on the matter. International children’s rights law has mostly focused on age limits for the recruitment of children and international criminal law has dealt with the prosecution and punishment of child recruiters. The disciplines of psychology and pedagogical sciences have merely emphasised the effects of and recovery from traumatic exposure by individuals, with some attempts for a more psychosocial perspective. Finally, studies in the field of transitional justice have paid remarkably little attention, until very recently, to the role of children in transitional justice mechanisms, both as victims and offenders.

This book brings together for the first time a wide range of leading scholars from three disciplinary perspectives (children’s rights, psychosocial studies and transitional justice). It aims at enhancing a multidisciplinary and comprehensive approach to the rehabilitation, reintegration and reconciliation processes of children and adolescents affected by armed conflict. The 22 chapters are specifically written for this volume and deal with theoretical perspectives, empirical findings and country reports. The book also contains prefaces from two distinguished academics and policy makers in the field of international children’s rights. It will therefore not only be of interest to academics, but also to policy makers, practitioners, non-governmental organisations, the media, and every citizen interested.


‘All chapters of the work are powerful and immensely knowledgeable and helpful. The book is a compressive work on the subject which should be recommended to academic researchers as well as layman.’
Farhad Malekian, distinguished Visiting Professor of International Criminal Law and Justice and Director of the Institute of International Criminal Law, Uppsala, Sweden, in Criminal Law Forum (2015) 26

Hoofdstukken

Table of Contents (p. 0)

Introduction

Children Affected by Armed Conflict at the Intersection of Three Fields of Study (p. 1)

PART I. SETTING THE SCENE: THREE DISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVES

1. International Legal Protection for the Recovery and Reintegration of War-Affected Children (p. 33)

2. Psychosocial Well-Being and the Integration of War-Affected Children: Toward a Community Resilience Approach (p. 57)

3. Integrating Transitional Justice and Disarmament, Demobilisation and Reintegration: The Need to Achieve Rehabilitation, Reintegration and Reconciliation for Child Soldiers and Child Victims of Enforced Disappearances (p. 77)

PART II. LESSONS LEARNT FROM CURRENT PRACTICES AND APPROACHES

4. And the Children Learned Not to Cry: Stories About Children and Transitional Justice in Latin America (p. 103)

5. When Hurbinek Survives. Transitional Justice and Children’s Rights: Lessons Learnt from Rwanda (p. 127)

6. “We Have Life Without Living”: Addressing the Legacies of Genocide for Rwanda’s Children and Youth (p. 153)

7. Rehabilitating Separated Children Through Holistic, Community-Based Models (p. 185)

8. Release and Reintegration of Child Soldiers: One Part of a Bigger Puzzle (p. 201)

9. No Return Home: The (Non-)Reintegration of Youth Ex-Combatants in Sierra Leone as a Challenge to the Contextualisation of DDR and Transitional Justice (p. 215)

10. Support to the Education and Livelihoods of War-Affected Children and Youth in Northern Uganda (p. 243)

11. Transitional Justice Implications for the Use of Child Soldiers in Eritrea (p. 263)

12. Children in Twentieth Century Europe Affected by War: Historical Experiences in Giving Them Refuge (p. 283)

PART III. EXPLORING RESOURCES THROUGH EMPIRICAL RESEARCH

13. Life in Rebel Captivity and its Challenges for the Psychosocial Rehabilitation and Reintegration of Former Child Soldiers: The Case of Northern Uganda (p. 305)

14. Psychosocial Care in Rehabilitation Centres for Former Child Soldiers in Northern Uganda (p. 329)

15. Lessons Learnt from the Rehabilitation and Reintegration of Girl Mothers in Northern Uganda: A Case-Study from Gulu District (p. 363)

16. Community-Based Approaches to the Reintegration of Self-Demobilised Child Soldiers: The Case of the Democratic Republic of Congo (p. 377)

17. Psychosocial Adjustment and Mental Health Services in Post-Conflict Sierra Leone: Experiences of CAAFAG and War-Affected Youth, Families and Service Providers (p. 403)

18. The Fit Between Mental Health Needs and Programming Responses (p. 437)

PART IV. LOOKING BACK, REACHING FORWARD

19. War-Affected Children, International Crisis of Meaning, and the Limits of Rehabilitation Programmes (p. 447)

20. Exploring the Context for Adolescent Mental Health and Psychosocial Assistance in the Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (p. 475)

21. A Gender Perspective on Girls and Young Women in Armed Conflicts and Organised Armed Violence – Some Examples from Latin America (p. 497)

22. On Children’s Rights and Wrongs: The Challenges for a Rights-Based Approach to Reintegration (p. 533)

About the Editors (p. 557)

About the Authors (p. 559)

Over de reeks

Series on Transitional Justice

Countries emerging from long periods of authoritarian rule must often confront a legacy of gross human rights abuses perpetrated over many years. During the past two decades, these age-old issues have been termed “problems of transitional justice”, both by academics and policy makers around the world. Given the frequency with which these problems arise, as well as the complexity of the issues involved, it is striking that no book series has taken the issue of transitional justice as its point of focus.

The Series on Transitional Justice offers a platform for high-quality research within the rapidly growing field of transitional justice. This research is, of necessity, inter-disciplinary in nature, drawing from disciplines such as law, political science, history, sociology, criminology, anthropology and psychology, as well as from various specialised fields of study such as human rights, victimology and peace studies. It is furthermore international in outlook, drawing on the knowledge and experience of academics and other specialists in many different regions of the world.

The series is aimed at a variety of audiences who are either working or interested in fields such as crime and justice; human rights; humanitarian law and human security; conflict resolution and peace building. These audiences may include academics, researchers, students, policy makers, practitioners, non-governmental organisations and the media.

Editorial board:
- Prof. S. Parmentier (University of Leuven, Belgium)
- Prof. Elmar Weitekamp (University of Tübingen, Germany)
- Prof. Jeremy Sarkin (University of South Africa) and
- Mina Rauschenbach (Université de Lausanne and University of Leuven) (Associate editor)

With a subscription to the series you enjoy a 15% discount on each volume.

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