1. Article 34 of the European Convention on Human Rights prescribes that individual applications must be directed against one of the Convention States. Consequently, private actors involved in proceedings against other private actors before domestic courts must complain about State (in)action in their application to the European Court of Human Rights. In other words, originally 'horizontal' conflicts must be 'verticalised' in order to be admissib...
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    € 89,-

  2. Statelessness remains an issue of concern in Europe. Stateless persons often experience problems with accessing basic rights, despite the proclamation of human rights and a right to a nationality for all. Various attempts have been made to address the issue of statelessness, for instance through the adoption of the United Nations Statelessness Conventions, but also by European regional cooperation mechanisms. This book analyses and places into...
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    € 102,-

  3. Since the adoption of the 1989 UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, all children in the world have rights that are protected by states - at least in theory. In practice, children's rights are grossly violated on a daily basis and on a global scale. This publication proposes that a better understanding of children's rights violations may be achieved if looking at law from a child's perspective.
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    € 103,-

  4. This book aims to systematically address the challenges caused by humanitarian crises and the provision of humanitarian assistance.
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    € 109,-