Human Security and International Law

In 1994, the United Nations Development Programme coined the term ‘human security’. It approached ‘security’ from a holistic perspective. Human security discourses have continually emphasised the central role of States as providers of human security. This volume challenges this paradigm, and highlights the part played by non-state actors in both threatening human security and also in rescuing or providing relief to those whose human security is endangered
Auteur(s):
Cedric Ryngaert, Math Noortmann
Reeks:
International Law
Volume:
12
boek | verschenen | 1e editie
december 2013 | xii + 204 blz.

Hardback
€ 65,-


ISBN 9781780682006

Inhoud

In 1994, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) coined the term ‘human security’ in the seminal UNDP Human Development Report. This report approached ‘security’ for the first time from a holistic perspective: security would no longer be viewed from a purely military perspective, but rather it would encapsulate economic, food, health, environmental, personal, community and political security. Although the concept of human security accords a higher status to individual than to governmental interests, human security discourses have continually emphasised the central role of States as providers of human security.

This volume challenges this paradigm, and highlights the part played by non-state actors in both threatening human security and also in rescuing or providing relief to those whose human security is endangered. It does so from a legal perspective, (international) law being one of the instruments used to realise human security as well as being a material source or guiding principle for the formation of human security-enhancing policies. In particular, the volume critically discusses how various non-state actors, such as armed opposition groups, multinational corporations, private military / security companies, non-governmental organisations, and national human rights institutions, participate in the construction of such policies, and how they are held legally accountable for their adverse impact on human security.

With contributions by: Veronika Bílková, Gentian Zyberi, Richard Carver, Heleen Struyven, Zeray Yihdego and Surabhi Ranganathan.

Hoofdstukken

Table of Contents (p. 0)

Human Security and International Law: the Challenge of Non-State Actors (p. 1)

Human Securities, International Laws and Non-State Actors: Bringing Complexity Back In (p. 13)

Ensuring Human Security in Armed Conflicts: The Role of Non-State Actors and its Reflection in Current International Humanitarian Law (p. 29)

The Role of Non-State Actors in Implementing the Responsibility to Protect (p. 53)

National Human Rights Institutions, Displacement and Human Security (p. 75)

Threats Posed to Human Security by Non-State Corporate Actors: the Answer of International Criminal Law (p. 101)

The Arms Trade Treaty and Human Security: What Role for NSAs? (p. 135)

Constructive Constraints? Conceptual and Practical Challenges to Regulating Private Military and Security Companies (p. 175)

Towards a (New) Human Security-Based Agenda for International Law and Non-State Actors? (p. 195)

Over de reeks

International Law

The series International Law contains high-quality monographs and edited volumes dedicated to current issues of public international law and the law of international organisations. It aims at a broader dissemination of doctoral research and collective research efforts.

General Editor of the series is Professor Jan Wouters, Jean Monnet Chair and Professor of International Law and International Organisations, and Director of the Institute for International Law and Leuven Centre for Global Governance Studies at the University of Leuven.

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