Effective Criminal Defence in Europe

Every year, millions of people across Europe – innocent and guilty - are arrested and detained by the police. Based on a three year research study, this book explores and compares access to effective defence in criminal proceedings across nine European jurisdictions that constitute examples of the three major legal traditions in Europe, inquisitorial, adversarial and post-state socialist: Belgium, England & Wales, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Poland and Turkey. It is essential reading for academics, researchers, students, defence lawyers and policy-makers in the area of criminal justice in Europe.
Auteur(s):
Edward Lloyd-Cape, Zaza Namoradze, Roger Smith, Taru Spronken
Reeks:
Ius Commune Europaeum
Volume:
87
boek | verschenen | 1e editie
juni 2010 | xxxii + 656 blz.

Paperback
€ 96,-


ISBN 9789400000933


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Inhoud

Every year, millions of people across Europe – innocent and guilty - are arrested and detained by the police. For some, their cases go no further than the police station, but many others eventually appear before a court. Many will spend time in custody both before and following trial. Initial attempts by the European Union to establish minimum procedural rights for suspects and defendants failed in 2007 in the face of opposition by a number of Member States that argued that the ECHR rendered EU regulation unnecessary. However, with ratification of the Lisbon Treaty, criminal defence rights are again on the agenda.

Based on a three year research study, the book explores and compares access to effective defence in criminal proceedings across nine European jurisdictions that constitute examples of the three major legal traditions in Europe, inquisitorial, adversarial and post-state socialist: Belgium, England & Wales, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Poland and Turkey.

Part I sets out the research methodology and an analysis of the baseline requirements that, according to European Court of Human Rights case law, have an impact on the rights of the accused. In addition to the general fair trial rights, such as the presumption of innocence, the right to silence, equality of arms, and the (conditional) right to release pending trial, the rights explored include: the right to information, the right to legal assistance and legal aid, and a number of procedural rights, such as the right to adequate time and facilities to prepare a defence, participation rights, the right to free interpretation and translation, and the right to reasoned decisions and to appeal. Part II consists of a description and critical analysis of access to effective criminal defence in the nine countries in the study. Part III includes a cross-jurisdictional analysis of compliance, in law and in practice, with the ECHR requirements. It also contains an analysis of how they interrelate, and of whether structures, systems and legal cultures exist to enable individuals to effectively exercise these rights.

This volume sets out to contribute to the implementation of the rights of suspects and defendants to a real and effective defence, especially for those who lack the means to pay for legal assistance themselves. The recommendations are designed to contribute to the development of meaningful policies and processes that will help to ensure effective criminal defence across the EU. The book is essential reading for academics, researchers, students, defence lawyers and policy-makers in the area of criminal justice in Europe.


About this book:
‘This book is timely and to be commended, not only in its breadth of research, but of value in bringing to the attention of practitioners and policy makers the issues now at the core of the implementation of the Stockholm Programme.’
David Dickson in the Journal of the Law Society of Scotland (2011)

Hoofdstukken

Table of Contents (p. 0)

PART I. EFFECTIVE CRIMINAL DEFENCE IN A EUROPEAN CONTEXT

Chapter 1. Effective Criminal Defence and Fair Trial (p. 1)

Chapter 2. The European Convention on Human Rights and the right to effective defence (p. 23)

PART II. NATIONAL APPROACHES TO EFFECTIVE CRIMINAL DEFENCE

Chapter 3. Belgium (p. 65)

Chapter 4. England and Wales (p. 107)

Chapter 5. Finland (p. 165)

Chapter 6. France (p. 203)

Chapter 7. Germany (p. 253)

Chapter 8. Hungary (p. 321)

Chapter 9. Italy (p. 373)

Chapter 10. Poland (p. 425)

Chapter 11. Turkey (p. 489)

PART III. ANALYSIS AND CONCLUSIONS

Chapter 12. The state of the nations: compliance with the ECHR (p. 545)

Chapter 13. The effective criminal defence triangle: comparing patterns (p. 573)

Effective Criminal Defence in Europe - Executive Summary and Recommendations (p. 613)

Annex 1. Desk Review Pro-forma (p. 633)

Annex 2. Critical Account of the Criminal Justice System Pro-forma (p. 647)

Annex 3. Guidance for Country Reports (p. 651)

Annex 4. The role of the Country Reviewer (p. 656)

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Ius Commune Europaeum

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The ‘Ius Commune Europaeum’ series focuses on the common foundations of the legal systems of the Member States of the European Union. It includes horizontal comparative legal studies as well as studies on the effect of EU law, treaties and international regulation within the national legal systems. All substantive fields of law are covered.

The series is published under the auspices of METRO, the Institute for Transnational Legal Research at the Maastricht University.

Guidelines for the submission of a manuscript or proposal can be found here.

Editorial Board
Prof. Dr. J. Smits (chair - Tilburg University, the Netherlands)
Prof. Dr. M. Faure (Maastricht University and Erasmus University Rotterdam, the Netherlands)
Prof. Dr. E. Vos (Maastricht University, the Netherlands).


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