Does Law Matter?

To what extent can differences in economic development among countries be explained by differing law and institutions. This volume takes stock of this debate and offers an integrated approach that not only takes into account the insights of economics, but also of comparative law and empirics.
Editor(s):
Michael Faure, Jan M. Smits
Reeks:
Ius Commune Europaeum
Volume:
100
boek | verschenen | 1e editie
oktober 2011 | xvi + 418 blz.

Hardback
€ 80,-


ISBN 9789400002173


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One of the most discussed questions in social science of the last decade is to what extent differences in economic development among countries can be explained by differing law and institutions. According to the ‘legal origins’-thesis, the answer is clear: it claims that differences in economic performance are to a large extent dependent on whether a country belongs to the civil law or common law family. Others have severely criticised this thesis. This volume takes stock of the debate and offers an integrated approach that not only takes into account the insights of economics, but also of comparative law and empirics.

This book is published to celebrate the 100th volume in the Ius Commune Europaeum series. Its publication also marks the 20th anniversary of the Maastricht European Institute for Transnational Legal Research (METRO) and the founding of the Maastricht European Private Law Institute (MEPLI).


About this book
‘It should be in all libraries of those interested the theory of legal origin.’
M. Kadima- Nzuji in Revue de droit international et de droit comparé (2013) 255.

Hoofdstukken

Table of Contents (p. 0)

Introduction (p. 1)

PART I: GENERAL

The Functionalism of Legal Origins (p. 19)

Law and Financial Development: What We are Learning from Time-Series Evidence (p. 41)

Legal Origins and Empirical Credibility (p. 99)

Measuring the Immeasurable: How to turn Law into Numbers (p. 115)

Law, Economics and History: Endogenous Institutional Change and Legal Innovation (p. 137)

Make or Take, Why Law can cause Growth (p. 155)

Legal Systems as Networks (p. 165)

The Role of Law in Economic Growth and Development (p. 179)

PART II: COMMON LAW, CIVIL LAW AND CHINA

Efficiency of the Common Law (p. 221)

On the Law and Economics of the Origins of the French Civil Code (p. 249)

Does China need Law for Economic Development? (p. 265)

PART III: SPECIFIC FIELDS OF LAW

How does Corporate Law Matter? ‘Law and Finance’ and Beyond (p. 295)

The Role of Property Law in Economic Growth (p. 331)

Does Environmental Law Matter? (p. 385)

Over de reeks

Ius Commune Europaeum

Subscribe to the series and receive a 15% discount on each volume.

The ‘Ius Commune Europaeum’ series focuses on the common foundations of the legal systems of the Member States of the European Union. It includes horizontal comparative legal studies as well as studies on the effect of EU law, treaties and international regulation within the national legal systems. All substantive fields of law are covered.

The series is published under the auspices of METRO, the Institute for Transnational Legal Research at the Maastricht University.

Guidelines for the submission of a manuscript or proposal can be found here.

Editorial Board
Prof. Dr. J. Smits (chair - Tilburg University, the Netherlands)
Prof. Dr. M. Faure (Maastricht University and Erasmus University Rotterdam, the Netherlands)
Prof. Dr. E. Vos (Maastricht University, the Netherlands).


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