Amnesty justified?

The manner in which South Africa dealt with its past and the process of granting amnesty through the Truth and Reconciliation Commission is generally considered legitimate. This is not the case, however, for many other amnesties granted in times of political transition or in post-conflict situations. National efforts to establish peace and democracy often clash with international legal demands. The core question of this study is what kind of amnesty laws can be considered legitimate in the light of the need to combine respect for human rights and the rule of law with the need to restore peace and public order.

Auteur(s):
Vera Vriezen
Reeks:
Human Rights Research Series
Volume:
52
boek | verschenen | 1e editie
juni 2012 | xviii + 270 blz.

Paperback
€ 59,-


ISBN 9781780680750


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Inhoud

The manner in which South Africa dealt with its past and the process of granting amnesty through the Truth and Reconciliation Commission is generally considered legitimate. This is not the case, however, for many other amnesties granted in times of political transition or in post-conflict situations. National efforts to establish peace and democracy often clash with international legal demands. Notwithstanding the practice of nation states often preferring amnesty to prosecution as a means of dealing with their violent past, international law is clearly moving in a direction in which impunity and thus amnesty have no place. Nevertheless, in political transitions or post-conflict situations, states need to balance the need to (re)build the rule of law with the need to end human rights violations. Foreclosing the possibility of granting amnesty might seriously invalidate a useful tool for ending or preventing wars, facilitating the transition to democratic civilian regimes or aiding the process of reconciliation. The core question of this study is what kind of amnesty laws can be considered legitimate in the light of the need to combine respect for human rights and the rule of law with the need to restore peace and public order. The study is dedicated to answering that question by examining the legality of national amnesty laws under international law, by looking into the United Nations’ position and practice on the subject, and by defining the rights of victims related to the practice of granting amnesty. The author determines the factors that are of importance when reviewing an amnesty measure or for actors considering granting amnesty, and develops a framework for the legitimate use of amnesty.


Hoofdstukken

Table of Contents (p. 0)

PART 1. INTRODUCTION

Chapter I. General introduction (p. 1)

PART 2. IMPUNITY AND AMNESTY

Chapter II. Impunity (p. 9)

Chapter III. Amnesty (p. 27)

PART 3. THE LEGALITY OF NATIONAL AMNESTY LAWS

Chapter IV. The legality of national amnesty laws under international law (p. 61)

Chapter V. The United Nations’ position and practice on impunity, amnesties and the duty to prosecute (p. 119)

Chapter VI. Amnesty and the rights of victims (p. 157)

PART 4. FRAMEWORK FOR THE LEGITIMATE USE OF AMNESTY

Chapter VII. Framework for the legitimate use of amnesty (p. 215)

Samenvatting (Dutch summary) (p. 229)

Bibliography (p. 235)

Curriculum Vitae (p. 263)

School of Human Rights Research Series (p. 265)

Over de reeks

Human Rights Research Series

The Human Rights Research Series’ central research theme is the nature and meaning of international standards in the field of human rights, their application and promotion in the national legal order, their interplay with national standards, and the international supervision of such application. Anyone directly involved in the definition, study, implementation, monitoring, or enforcement of human rights will find this series an indispensable reference tool.

The Series is published together with the world famous Netherlands Network for Human Rights Research (formerly School of Human Rights Research), a joint effort by human rights researchers in the Netherlands.

Editorial Board: Prof. dr. Antoine Buyse (Utrecht University), Prof. dr. Fons Coomans (Maastricht University), Prof. dr. Yvonne Donders (Chair - University of Amsterdam), Dr. Antenor Hallo de Wolf (University of Groningen), Prof. dr. Kristin Henrard (Erasmus University Rotterdam), Prof. dr. Nicola Jägers (Tilburg University), Prof. Titia Loenen (Leiden University) Prof. dr. Janne Nijman (T.M.C. Asser Instituut) and Prof. dr. Brigit Toebes (University of Groningen).

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