The Privatized Art of War

In the modern globalized world, so-called private military and security companies (PMSCs) are employed by a variety of actors in times of both war and peace. They are employed by, and perform a plethora of services for, not only international organizations, NGOs and multinationals, but also States. Given that there are still regulatory gaps in the national and international legal frameworks applicable to PMSCs and that the lines of responsibility often are unclear, State responsibility becomes an important instrument for attaining justice and ensuring respect for international law by private contractors.
Auteur(s):
Evgeni Moyakine
Reeks:
School of Human Rights Research Series
Volume:
67
boek | verschenen | 1e editie
februari 2015 | xvi + 480 blz.

Paperback
€ 85,-


ISBN 9781780682815


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Inhoud

In the modern globalized world, so-called private military and security companies (PMSCs) are employed by a variety of actors in times of both war and peace. They are employed by, and perform a plethora of services for, not only international organizations, NGOs, and multinationals, but also States. It goes without saying that, especially in areas torn apart by armed conflicts, these corporations and their personnel can and sometimes do engage in different types of misconduct that may constitute violations of international law. While there are still regulatory gaps in the national and international legal frameworks applicable to PMSCs and self-regulatory schemes of the industry generally appear to be lacking effectiveness, the lines of responsibility often remain unclear. In light of this, State responsibility becomes an important instrument for attaining justice and ensuring respect for international law by private contractors.

The use of PMSCs by States in conflict zones may, in certain instances, be considered morally problematic and might enable States to outsource fundamental governmental tasks to essentially private actors without necessarily being held responsible for instances of misconduct. This book investigates the possibility of applying the doctrine of State responsibility to the employment of PMSCs in areas affected by conflicts and to breaches of international law committed by these companies and their personnel. It examines an array of circumstances in which the unlawful conduct of PMSCs and their staff may be attributed to States under international law and the extent of such attribution. The study further analyzes the application of positive obligations imposed by international law on States and the scope of this application. It is illustrated that not only States hiring PMSCs, but also States where these companies are active, and States where they are registered or incorporated, are to be held responsible when violations of international law are attributed to these States in accordance with certain modes of attribution. In addition, the States in question also bear international responsibility when they fail to comply with their positive duties of result and diligent conduct stemming from the fields of international humanitarian and human rights law.

Hoofdstukken

Table of Contents (p. 0)

Chapter I. General Introduction (p. 1)

Chapter II. Privatization of War and Security – War is Business and Vice Versa (p. 45)

Chapter III. Existing Legal Framework of PMSC Operation (p. 105)

Chapter IV. Legal Status of PMSC Employees (p. 157)

Chapter V. State Responsibility under the Draft Articles on State Responsibility (p. 201)

Chapter VI. State Responsibility for Non-Compliance with Positive International Law Obligations (p. 303)

Chapter VII. Summary, Overall Conclusions, and Final Observations (p. 393)

Dutch Summary – Nederlandse Samenvatting (p. 409)

Russian Summary (p. 417)

Selected Bibliography (p. 427)

Table of Cases (p. 457)

Selected United Nations Documents (p. 463)

Index (p. 469)

Curriculum Vitae (p. 477)

Over de reeks

School of Human Rights Research Series

The School of Human Rights Research Series traces the history and the development of the human rights movement. Through its distinctive interdisciplinary approach, the series provides a powerful insight into recent developments in the field of human rights - their promotion, implementation and monitoring. Anyone directly involved in the definition, study, implementation, monitoring, or enforcement of human rights will find this series an indispensable reference tool.

The world famous School of Human Rights Research is a joint effort by human rights researchers in the Netherlands. Its central research theme is the nature and meaning of international standards in the field of human rights, their application and promotion in the national legal order, their interplay with national standards, and the international supervision of such application.
Editorial Board of the Series: Prof. dr. J.E. Goldschmidt (Utrecht University), Prof. dr. D.A. Hellema (Utrecht University), Prof. dr. W.J.M. van Genugten (Tilburg University), Prof. dr. F. Coomans (Maastricht University), Prof. dr. P.A.M. Mevis (Erasmus University Rotterdam), Dr.J.-P. Loof (Leiden University) and Dr. O.M. Ribbelink (Asser Institute).

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