Armed Forces and International Jurisdictions

This book explores the relationship between armed forces and International tribunals, courts and non-judicial bodies, taking into consideration the case-law developed by those jurisdictions.
Auteur(s):
Marco Odello, Francesco Seatzu
boek | verschenen | 1e editie
september 2013 | xvi + 234 blz.

Paperback
€ 65,-


ISBN 9789400001831

Inhoud

Different activities conducted by armed forces and their personnel are governed by different branches of international law, in particular international humanitarian law, international criminal law and human rights law. In recent times, the growing number and jurisprudence of international jurisdictions have also addressed the activities of military personnel engaged in different scenarios, including the internal organisation of armed forces and forms of violation of different rules of international law. Relevant decisions include, for instance, the international ad hoc criminal Tribunals, special courts, and truth and reconciliation commissions, as well as human rights courts and the International Court of Justice.

This book explores the relationship between armed forces and international tribunals, courts and non-judicial bodies, taking into consideration the case-law developed by those jurisdictions.

The contributors are legal academics from various European universities’ law schools, with a specific expertise in international human rights, criminal and humanitarian law.


About this book
‘The book illustrates the effects of international law on the military. It is particularly interesting for readers involved in the military or in the international field.’
Amanda Robinson in NLMR 2014 (266)

Hoofdstukken

Table of Contents (p. 0)

Chapter 1. Armed Forces and International Jurisdictions: a General Survey (p. 1)

Chapter 2. International Legal Regimes, Armed Forces and International Jurisdictions (p. 15)

Chapter 3. Armed Forces and the International Court of Justice: the Relevance of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights Law to the Conduct of Military Operations (p. 51)

Chapter 4. Armed Forces before the International Court of Justice: the Jus Ad Bellum (p. 91)

Chapter 5. The Practice of International Courts and Tribunals on Armed Forces: Issues of Status and Attribution (p. 141)

Chapter 6. Echoes of ‘The Life of Johnny Reb’. The Protection of the Fundamental Rights and Freedoms of Armed Forces Personnel in a Comparative Human Rights Perspective (p. 169)

Chapter 7. The Relationship between Truth Commissions and Armed Forces (p. 189)

Conclusions and Recommendations (p. 207)

Selected Bibliography (p. 213)

Table of Cases (p. 217)

Index (p. 221)

The authors (p. 233)